Glamorous girdles, cinchers and corselettes             Living in the past is my future

Joan Crawford photographed for Dancing Lady (1933)

Joan Crawford photographed for Dancing Lady (1933)

(Source: deforest, via bellecs)




Joan Crawford at home, 1940.

Joan Crawford at home, 1940.

(Source: barbarastanwyck, via normajeanebaker)



fuckyeahmodernflapper:

Joan Crawford, 1925

fuckyeahmodernflapper:

Joan Crawford, 1925



fuckyesoldhollywood:

Clark Gable and Joan Crawford

fuckyesoldhollywood:

Clark Gable and Joan Crawford



barbarastanwyck:

Joan Crawford and John Garfield on the set of Humoresque

barbarastanwyck:

Joan Crawford and John Garfield on the set of Humoresque

(via gypsyqueenlife)



marthaivers:

 Joan Crawford, 1927

marthaivers:

Joan Crawford, 1927

(Source: jeanarthur, via fieldsally)



hoodoothatvoodoo:

Joan Crawford
1931

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Joan Crawford

1931

(via miss-flapper)



deforest:

Joan Crawford’s famous Charleston kick as captured in the year 1926. 
Joan came to Hollywood in 1925 as a hard-knock Broadway chorus girl without censorship. She was a mascot of such favorite venues as the Cocoanut Grove and the Montmartre, where she would easily devastate her competition in countless Charleston contests. She collected more champion trophies than she knew what to do with. 
Her vigorous Charleston became legendary as astonishingly early as 1930. When the age of the flapper buckled to patronizing reconsideration, Joan and her verve remained substantial in the nostalgia for a lost era. “Remember when Joan Crawford was a ‘hotcha’ baby tearing up the floor at the Grove?” sighed fan magazines, newspaper columnists, writers, actors, directors, producers, crew members, and wistful fellow Jazz Age symbols. 
A rare exception in the Hollywood practice of impermanence, the memory of Joan as scalding “hey-hey” flapper of the Roaring Twenties never disappeared from the foreground. The beloved Crawford Charleston—breathless, stomping, panting, kicking, sweating, grinning, electrifying—has endured the restless American cultures of nearly nine decades. To this day it continues as an indestructible icon belling the legend of 1920s youth.

deforest:

Joan Crawford’s famous Charleston kick as captured in the year 1926.

Joan came to Hollywood in 1925 as a hard-knock Broadway chorus girl without censorship. She was a mascot of such favorite venues as the Cocoanut Grove and the Montmartre, where she would easily devastate her competition in countless Charleston contests. She collected more champion trophies than she knew what to do with.

Her vigorous Charleston became legendary as astonishingly early as 1930. When the age of the flapper buckled to patronizing reconsideration, Joan and her verve remained substantial in the nostalgia for a lost era. “Remember when Joan Crawford was a ‘hotcha’ baby tearing up the floor at the Grove?” sighed fan magazines, newspaper columnists, writers, actors, directors, producers, crew members, and wistful fellow Jazz Age symbols.

A rare exception in the Hollywood practice of impermanence, the memory of Joan as scalding “hey-hey” flapper of the Roaring Twenties never disappeared from the foreground. The beloved Crawford Charleston—breathless, stomping, panting, kicking, sweating, grinning, electrifying—has endured the restless American cultures of nearly nine decades. To this day it continues as an indestructible icon belling the legend of 1920s youth.

(via staria)



sunsetgun:

Joan Crawford.

sunsetgun:

Joan Crawford.




Joan Crawford in Rain (1932)

Joan Crawford in Rain (1932)

(Source: deforest, via bettina-dawes)




Liz, 22, Barcelona. Future journalist.
History Nerd who loves
drinking Cocktails & daydreaming.
1920's - 1960's fanatic.
Old Hollywood, Mod Culture, Period Dramas, Silent Era stars, Classy people, Art...
C'mon, let's twist again!
I also run allaboutclassichollywood
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